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Housing Choice, Job Access, and Affordability
Allowing more people to live and work in walkable places near transit can bring benefits but does mean more change. In many locations, such as at the DMV property, shopping centers, and larger vacant or underused lots, there is the opportunity to allow taller new buildings (see an example below and a diagram of how height can connect to affordability). Taller buildings, generally 5-7 stories inside the Beltline and higher near and outside the Beltline, would mean:
-More people are allowed to work and live in walkable places near BRT stations.
-More height could be allowed in exchange for providing deeply affordable homes.
-Taller buildings in those locations than in the past.
-More new buildings and change will take place near BRT stations.
With that in mind, which statement do you agree with more?

Examples of a building with units affordable to low-income households a church and commercial space (top) and a height bonus for affordability (bottom)
I'm fine with taller buildings and more change near BRT stations if it means allowing a wide range of affordable housing options and more shopping and offices in the surrounding area.
95%
I'd rather not see much change around BRT stations.
5%
Closed to responses | 137 Responses

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Deep affordability
How important is it to create deeply affordable housing opportunities for low and very low income households along the corridor?

Very important
56%
Important
25%
Somewhat important
11%
Not important
8%
Closed to responses | 144 Responses

Question title

Community health and climate change
Investing in sidewalks and other pedestrian improvements and allowing more people to live and work in walkable places near transit improves health and reduces carbon emissions and air pollution, but does mean more change in the area. This would involve new buildings, but also the creation of more places to work, get groceries, eat, shop, and more.
With that in mind, which statement do you agree with more?

Community health and climate change Investing in sidewalks and other pedestrian improvements and allowing more people to live and work in walkable places near transit improves health and reduces carbon emissions and air pollution but does mean more change in the area. This would involve new buildings but also the creation of more places to work get groceries eat shop and more. With that in mind which statement do you agree with more?
I'm fine with more change near BRT stations if it means improving walkability and reducing carbon emissions and air pollution
98%
I'd rather not see much change around BRT stations
2%
Closed to responses | 142 Responses

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What is your racial identity?

White
66%
Black
16%
Asian
7%
Other
6%
Hispanic
5%
American Indian/Alaskan Native
0%
Closed to responses | 140 Responses

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Where do you live or work?

Elsewhere
49%
Between downtown and Raleigh Boulevard on or near New Bern Avenue
28%
Between Raleigh Boulevard and the Beltline on or near New Bern Avenue
14%
Between the Beltline and New Hope Road on or near New Bern Avenue
9%
Closed to responses | 143 Responses

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How old are you?

30-44
56%
45-64
19%
18-29
14%
Younger than 18
11%
65 and older
1%
Closed to responses | 140 Responses

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Do you own or rent your home?

Own
82%
Rent
18%
Closed to responses | 137 Responses

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Would you like to dive more into the details?

Yes, I want to get into the details
68%
No, I'm good
32%
Closed to responses | 136 Responses

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Any other thoughts or comments?

Closed for Comments