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The project logo CD Zone Survey

The project logo CD Zone Survey

The Corridor Development (CD) Zone was created in conjunction with and to implement the Frederick Avenue Corridor Land Use Plan, adopted in 2001. The plan envisioned all of the Corridor being zoned CD, to encourage a mix of housing, restaurants, stores and offices that would revitalize the Corridor. The CD Zone itself does not make specific land use recommendations for individual properties, such as where a grocery store should be located. The CD Zone does establish the standards that must be met and the processes that must be followed in order to build something like a grocery store. The City of Gaithersburg is now seeking public input on whether or not the CD Zone, after seventeen years, needs to be revised. The following survey and its results will help staff, the City Council, and the Planning Commission determine how, if at all, the CD Zone should be changed in order to better serve development in the Corridor, highlighted in green below. A separate project page with more information about this effort may be found here: http://www.gaithersburgmd.gov/government/city-projects/cd-zone.  Comments and questions may be sent to [email protected]

Zoning and other land use regulations have many goals. These goals are meant to protect and benefit residents and property owners. Please rate the following goals according to importance.
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What do you think the purposes of the CD Zone should be? Please choose up to 3.
Encourage development, redevelopment and renovation of declining or underutilized properties along the corridor.
55%
Create a more attractive and cohesive development pattern and enhance the City's sense of place.
37%
Promote revitalization within the Corridor by encouraging new private investment.
33%
Create clearly defined standards and regulations that provide more certainty of what is feasible on a property and create opportunities to add value through density and mix of uses.
32%
Promote quality development through flexible development standards and a proactive design approach.
22%
Encourage the use of consistent architecture, streetscape and visual themes.
22%
Create a streamlined process for zoning and plan approvals.
14%
Encourage intensification of land use in areas identified as appropriate for greater densities.
12%
Closed to responses | 273 Responses
The CD Zone does not list each individual permitted use, but allows for consideration any use permitted in any other zone. For example, the E-1 Zone allows farms, so farms are allowed in the CD Zone. Should the CD Zone instead clearly list all individual allowable uses?
Yes
57%
Not Sure
24%
No
19%
Closed to responses | 263 Responses
Usually, specific uses on a property in the CD Zone must be approved by the Planning Commission and City Council. However, the CD Zone also has Special Exception uses that only require final approval by the City Board of Appeals. The Board of Appeals may permit the use, deny the use, or permit the use with some restrictions. Should the CD Zone continue to have Special Exception uses?
No, the CD Zone should not have any Special Exception uses. All uses should be approved by the Planning Commission or City Council.
50%
Yes, the CD Zone should continue to have Special Exception uses which require approval by the Board of Appeals rather than the Planning Commission and City Council.
36%
Not Sure
14%
Closed to responses | 270 Responses

The CD Zone divides the Frederick Avenue Corridor into three districts with differing height restrictions. However, within these districts are properties zoned other than CD that allow greater height. The non-CD properties are highlighted in dark green on the map and the allowable heights are illustrated in the graph below. 

 

 

 

Based on the height graphic above, please rate the following:
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A setback is a zoning tool that requires buildings to be a certain distance away from property lines. The graphic below illustrates four different rear setback distances (15 feet, 20 feet, 30 feet, and 50 feet) on a property that backs onto single- family detached houses. 

Many older established residentially zoned neighborhoods back onto the Frederick Avenue Corridor. Based upon the graphic above, development within the CD Zone should: (Please choose up to 2 options)
Have setbacks be determined by the Planning Commission or City Council on a project by project basis.
33%
Have a 50 foot rear setback from residentially zoned properties.
33%
Have a 30 foot rear setback from residentially zoned properties.
24%
Have a 20 foot rear setback from residentially zoned properties.
8%
Have a 15 foot rear setback from residentially zoned properties.
7%
Closed to responses | 245 Responses
If waivers to height and setback restrictions may be granted in the CD Zone, the granting of such waivers should be based on a finding that: (Please select all that apply)
The development incorporates increased public amenities, recreational and/or green spaces.
61%
The development incorporates dedication of land for civic uses such as schools, libraries, or fire departments.
50%
The waiver will be compatible with existing and proposed adjacent land uses and would not detrimentally impact those uses or public facilities.
49%
The waiver is necessary to attract an appropriate and compatible type or caliber of user.
27%
The development incorporates more affordable housing than required.
25%
The waiver is necessary to implement the City Master Plan.
21%
The waiver is necessary to implement a defined priority in the City's Annual Strategic Plan.
15%
No waivers should be granted.
13%
Closed to responses | 239 Responses

Floor area ratio (FAR) is the ratio of building size (total square feet) to lot size. It is sometimes used as an alternative to other building size controls (like height and setback requirements) as it affords greater flexibility in design. FAR also allows property owners to easily calculate how much development they may build.  The images below each illustrate a 1.5 FAR. On a 100 square foot lot, you could build 150 square feet (1.5 x 100). As shown below, the building(s) can take many different forms as long as the FAR does not exceed 1.5.

Based upon the associated graphic, are you open to having floor area ratio (FAR) be the standard requirement in the CD Zone?
The City should consider having FAR requirements in the CD Zone with additional defined limitations such as height restrictions.
52%
The City should consider having FAR requirements in the CD Zone.
25%
The City should not consider having FAR requirements in the CD Zone.
23%
Closed to responses | 178 Responses
Currently within the Corridor, there are properties with zones that allow a .75 floor area ratio (FAR) and others that allow a 1.5 FAR. Note that a greater FAR allows more development than a lower FAR. If FAR is to be used in the CD Zone, then:
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If floor area ratio (FAR) is used in the CD Zone, density bonuses could be granted to developments that incorporate elements that reflect City priorities. Density bonuses should be granted if a development: (Please select all that apply)
Incorporates increased public amenities, recreational and/or green spaces.
72%
Incorporates dedication of land for civic uses such as schools, libraries, or fire departments.
58%
Incorporates more affordable housing than required.
35%
Implements a defined priority in the City's Annual Strategic Plan.
27%
No density bonuses should be given.
19%
Closed to responses | 192 Responses

The map above shows the Corridor with a 1/4 mile buffer. Which of the following best describes you? (Select all that apply)
Shop in Corridor
55%
Resident-live within 1/4 mile (walking distance) of Corridor
41%
Resident-live outside 1/4 quarter mile (walking distance) of Corridor
36%
Work in Corridor
14%
Own property in Corridor
13%
Other interested party
12%
Own business in Corridor
5%
Developer
2%
Closed to responses | 197 Responses
With which generation do you identify?
Generation X (born mid 1960s-early 1980s)
48%
The Baby Boomers (born mid 1940s-early 1960s)
32%
Millenials/ Generation Y (born mid 1980s-late 1990s)
18%
The Silent Generation (born 1920s-early 1940s)
2%
Generation Z (born 2000-)
1%
Closed to responses | 199 Responses
If you'd like, please provide your contact information to receive future CD Zone related notices.