Skip Navigation

Thank you to the approximately 400 people who shared their thoughts with us during the first phase of our engagement. Their feedback helped us better understand the mobility needs and priorities in north King County.

From what we heard, when Link light rail begins to the U District, Roosevelt, and Northgate stations and Metro considers changes to bus service, it’s important that:

  • East-west connections are improved to move people across town.
  • Door-to-door travel time is either faster or similar to trips made by bus today.
  • Connections to hospitals and medical facilities like Seattle Children’s Hospital, the University of Washington Medical Center, and facilities on First Hill are improved.
  • Connections to new markets like South Lake Union are improved.
  • Transfers from bus-to bus and bus-to-Link light rail are easy to understand and easy to do.

Below is a map of how the buses in this project currently move in and out of the area. This is our current network of service.

Based on the feedback from the community and the guidance from our Mobility Board, this is the map of the proposed ideas for how buses could move in and out of the area when the UDistrict, Roosevelt, and Northgate Station Link light rail stations open to meet the needs identified by the community in the first phase of engagement.

Let’s look at the major ideas more closely:

 

What areas do you typically travel to/from?
Bitter Lake
Broadview
Bryant
Bothell
Downtown Seattle
First HIll
Fremont
Green Lake
Greenwood
Hawthorne Hills
Lake City Meadowbrook
Lake City Cedar Park
Lake City Matthews Beach
Maple Leaf
Montlake
North Lake
Northgate
Phinney Ridge
Pinehurst
Ravenna
Roosevelt
Sand Point
Shoreline
South Lake Union
Squire Park
University District
View Ridge
Wallingford
Lake City Victory Heights
Lake Forest Park
Laurelhurst
Woodinville
Other
Select a response
How do you typically travel to and from these destinations?
Bus
Light rail and bus
Community Ride
Walk to work
Drive
Carpool
Bicycle
Other
Select a response
If you do use transit, what is your route(s)?
5X
26
31
32
40
41
44
45
62
63
64
65
67
70
71
73
74
75
76
77
78
301
303
304
308
309
312
316
330
345
346
347
348
355
372
373
ST 522
Another route not listed here
Select a response

1. Directing Lake City, ST-522, and Maple Leaf service to Roosevelt Station

What this means:

This change would improve existing express service to South Lake Union and First Hill by adding additional trips earlier and later during commute hours. By directing routes 312 and ST 522 to the Roosevelt Station, we have additional resources we can add to the ST 522 service. The shorter more reliable bus routes would enable them to come more often in the middle of the day, evening, and on weekends. Route ST 522 would also run more often from Seattle in the morning and to Seattle during the evening (reverse commute), which will offer new travel opportunities to riders.

Trade off:

By removing service that is currently on 5th Ave NE in Maple Leaf we are able to better serve the ST 522 area and improve connections to the Roosevelt station area through other services. Some people may have to take a bus and the Link light rail to get to Downtown Seattle. It may take slightly longer to get to downtown Seattle when transferring to light rail when traffic is light, but the trip will be much faster and more reliable when transferring during the rush hours. 

How do you feel about this this idea?
I really like this idea
I kind of like this idea
I feel neutral about this idea
I don’t like this idea
I strongly dislike it
Select a response
Why do you feel this way about this idea? Select any that apply.
It will improve east-west connections.
It will provide more consistent service by connecting to Link for the most congested part of the journey.
It will improve service in the SR 522 area.
Concerned about longer travel time.
Concerned about less convenient service.
Concerned about transferring to Link or another bus.
Concerned about having to walk further to reach transit.
Other (open-ended)
Select a response

2. East to West service connects at Northgate Station

What this means:

By removing duplicate service that is serving the same north-south destinations as the Link light rail, we can provide new service connecting neighborhoods east and west of Northgate to Northgate Station.

Trade off:

The result of this proposed idea would mean less north-south bus service in the north Green Lake area, and that riders traveling to the south end of Downtown Seattle may experience a more reliable but longer overall travel time.

How do you feel about this this idea?
I really like this idea
I kind of like this idea
I feel neutral about this idea
I don’t like this idea
I strongly dislike it
Select a response
Why do you feel this way about this idea? I feel:
• It will improve east-west connections.
• It will provide more consistent service by connecting to Link for the most congested part of the journey.
• It will improve how often the bus comes on routes in Shoreline and North Seattle.
• It will provide new connections to South Lake Union.
• It will improve connections to hospitals and medical facilities like Seattle Children’s Hospital, the University of Washington Medical Center, and hospitals on First Hill
• Concerned about longer travel time.
• Concerned about less convenient service.
• Concerned about transferring to Link or another bus.
• Concerned about having to walk further to reach transit.
• Other (open-ended)
Select a response

3. Buses to/from Northeast Seattle connect at Roosevelt Station and University District Station

What this means: 

This proposed change would create new and improve existing east-west connections by changing the paths of buses to run all day and have more direct connection to the Roosevelt and University District Link light rail stations.

Trade off:

This proposed change would result in less service through the center of UW, but new service along NE 45th street and University of Washington northern edge of campus. By shifting bus resources from routes that duplicate Link and other bus routes we will be able to provide new and improved connections to Link. We are also balancing service to University of Washington with people seeking to connect to light rail and other local area destinations, including the U District.

How do you feel about this this idea?
I really like this idea
I kind of like this idea
I feel neutral about this idea
I don’t like this idea
I strongly dislike it
Select a response
Why do you feel this way about this idea? I feel:
It will improve connections to the U-District area
It will provide more consistent service by connecting to Link for the most congested part of the journey.
Concerned about longer travel time.
Concerned about less convenient service.
Concerned about transferring to Link or another bus.
Concerned about having to walk further to reach transit.
Other (open-ended)
Select a response

4. Buses to/from Wallingford and Green Lake neighborhoods would connect at Roosevelt Station and University District Station

What this means: This proposed change would improve connections on the west side of Interstate 5 with Link light rail station at Roosevelt and in the University District. We are able to do this by adjusting he amount of service operating to Downtown Seattle via Aurora.

Trade off: By concentrating service on one street area, this will generally increase service but will result in less service on other roads.  This will result in improved connections to Roosevelt, NE Seattle and U. District but might reduce service connections to the Aurora corridor.

How do you feel about this this idea?
I really like this idea
I kind of like this idea
I feel neutral about this idea
I don't like this idea
I strongly dislike this idea
Select a response
Why do you feel this way about this idea?
• It will improve east-west connections.
• It will provide more consistent service by connecting to Link for the most congested part of the journey.
• It will improve connections to Roosevelt, NE Seattle and U. District
• Concerned about longer travel time.
• Concerned about less convenient service.
• Concerned about transferring to Link or another bus.
• Concerned about having to walk further to reach transit.
• Other (open-ended)
Select a response

5. Buses from Shoreline and North Seattle that currently go to downtown Seattle are directed instead to Northgate Station:

What this means:

This change would improve travel times to and from Downtown Seattle during the busiest time of the day by directing service to Northgate Station. Northgate Station will be a hub where riders can connect to fast service via Link light rail to the University District, Capitol Hill, and Downtown Seattle, and reach other destinations such as South Lake Union, Uptown, and First Hill by bus.

Trade off:

The result of this proposed idea would be that service will be more reliable, but some people may have to take a bus and the Link light rail to get to Downtown Seattle.

How do you feel about this this idea?
I really like this idea
I kind of like this idea
I feel neutral about this idea
I don't like this idea
I strongly dislike this idea
Select a response
Why do you feel this way about this idea? I feel:
It will improve north-south connections.
It will provide more consistent service by connecting to Link for the most congested part of the journey.
It will improve how often the bus comes on routes in Shoreline and North Seattle.
It will provide new connections to South Lake Union.
It will improve connections to hospitals and medical facilities like Seattle Children’s Hospital, the University of Washington Medical Center, and hospitals on First Hill
Concerned about longer travel time.
Concerned about less convenient service.
Concerned about transferring to Link or another bus.
Concerned about having to walk further to reach transit.
Other (comment below)
Select a response
Is there anything that you would like to share that was not addressed in the proposed ideas and network shown above?
Have you ridden the Link light rail before?
Yes
No
Select a response
If yes, how often do you use Link light rail?
Daily
2-3 times a week
Once a week
Once a month
On occasion
Select a response
If yes, how do you typically get to Link light rail?
I walk or roll.
I get dropped off at a Link light rail station.
I transfer from the bus.
I bike.
Click to view results
How comfortable are you transferring from bus to Link light rail?
Very comfortable
Somewhat comfortable
Neither comfortable nor uncomfortable
Somewhat uncomfortable
Very uncomfortable
Select a response
Why do you feel this way about transferring?
I face mobility challenges getting between the bus stop and train platforms.
I worry that I will miss my connecting service and be late for where I need to go.
I do not have an Orca card, so I am worried about having to pay more.
Other (comment below)
Select a response
How do you normally pay your fare?
Cash
Youth ORCA
Regional Reduced Fare Permit (seniors 65+ and riders with disabilities)
Adult ORCA
ORCA LIFT
U-Pass
Employer or school provided ORCA
Transit Go App
I don't pay
Other (comment below)
Select a response

OPTIONAL: Demographic and household information

King County wants to make sure everyone is heard and served. The following demographic questions help us make sure that we're hearing from a diversity of voices that reflect the whole community and able to center our decision-making in the voices of communities that have been historically un(der)served. We would appreciate this information, but it is not required.

How many people, including yourself, live in your household?
1
2
3
4
5 or more
Select a response
How many people in your household, including yourself, ride the bus at least once per week?
None
1
2
3
4
5 or more
Select a response
What is your age?
15 or younger
16-17
18-19
20-24
25-34
35-44
45-54
55-64
65 or older
Select a response
If you have a disability, please indicate what kind. (Mark all that apply)
Mobility
Vision
Hearing
Cognitive
Other (please specify below)
Select a response
What is the primary language you speak at home?
Amharic
Arabic
Bhutanese
Burmese/Karen
Chinese (please specify Cantonese, Toshianese, and/or Mandarin etc.)
Congolese
English
Farsi
Japanese
Korean
Laotian
Mon Khmer/Cambodian
Oromo
Nepali
Pashto/Dari
Russian
Somali
Spanish
Tagalog
Thai
Tigrinya
Ukrainian
Vietnamese
Other (please specify)
Select a response
What is your race/ethnicity? Select all that apply.
African American
Alaska Native
Algerian
American Indian or Alaska Native
American Indian
Amhara
Asian Indian
Black or African American
Cambodian
Central or South American Indian
Chamorro
Chinese
Cuban
Egyptian
Eritrean
Filipino
Guatemalan
Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish
Hmong
Iranian
Iraqi
Japanese
Jordanian
Korean
Laotian
Lebanese
Mexican, Mexican-American
Middle Eastern or North African
Moroccan
Native Hawaiian
Oromo
Puerto Rican
Salvadorian
Somali
Sudanese
Palestinian
Polynesian
Samoan
Syrian
Thai
Tigray
Vietnamese
West African
White (Caucasian)
Biracial
Multiple Ethnicities
Another not listed here
Select a response
What is your annual household income?
7,500 or under
$7,501 to $15,000
$15,001 to $25,000
$25,001 to $35,000
$35,001 to $55,000
$55,001 to $75,000
$75,001 to $100,000
$100,001 to $150,000
$150,001 to $200,000
More than $200,000
I don't know/prefer not to say
Select a response
How did you hear about this survey?
Facebook
Twitter
Friend
My employer
My college or university
An organization I'm involved with
News outlet or neighborhood blog
Poster
Metro transit alert
Other (please specify)
Select a response
From the time you were notified, were you given enough time to provide meaningful feedback in Metro’s decision-making process?
Yes
No
I don't know
Select a response
What resources did you use to understand the bus change concepts that Metro is considering? (Check all that apply)
Metro Online
Metro Matters blog
Spoke with a staff member at a community event
Attended a presentation by staff members at a meeting hosted by another group
Information shared by a Mobility Board member
Information shared by the news media or neighborhood blog
Other (please specify)
Select a response
Did these resources help you understand the change concepts being considered and how these changes would affect you?
Yes
No
I don’t know
Select a response
Did you give feedback in the first phase of public engagement about the North Link Connections project in the fall?
Yes
No
I don’t know
Select a response
Do you see how public feedback helped shape the ideas being considered?
Yes
No
I don’t know
Select a response
Would you like to sign up for project updates? If so, please provide your email address:

Thank you for taking the time share your thoughts about this project. Your feedback will be used to inform decisions about the proposed changes to bus service in this project.